man hole

The City of Wessington Springs hired Hydro-Klean to perform monoform manhole rehabilitation on four  manholes on State Street.

Manhole refurbishing work is underway on State Street in Wessington Springs to refurbish four of the city’s manholes in most need of repair. 

The City of Wessington Springs hired Hydro-Klean to perform monoform manhole rehabilitation on the structures that allow city workers to access the sewer system. Monoform is a system designed to provide full structural restoration of deteriorated brick, block and precast manholes.

Most manholes in Springs are made of brick, and with the material behind the bricks failing, four of the manholes on State Street were essentially caving in. Additionally, the manholes were wrought with standing water due to disrepair within the bottom trough flow lines. 

It’s no surprise that the State Street manholes would be among the most in need of repair.  Based on a sewer study conducted through a state grant in 2011, the State Street sewer line was determined to be one of the most problematic, and oldest, in town. 

In fact, Thomas Ruppelt, CCT Operator for Hydro-Clean, said that the State Street sewer is among the oldest he’s inspected across the region. 

City water superintendent Jim Vavra became aware of the breadth of the problem during annual video inspection and cleaning conducted by Hydro-Klean earlier this spring, and scheduled the manhole rehabilitation for the fall. 

The cost to rehabilitate the four manholes is $20,000 and will be paid from the city’s sewer fund.

Hydro-Klean is using one of the manholes as an example, hosting a presentation on State Street Thursday for other area  municipalities to witness the monoform process.

Vavra said that the project should be complete by the end of this week.